Anything but Ordinary- Kristiana Reed

Anything but Ordinary KR

The tender age of thirteen and grunge, grime and grey eyeshadow defined me. Pegged me tightly into a hole, type cast and left there to mature. To phase into adulthood with only bangs and black kohl to cling onto. For twenty-four months, Avril Lavigne’s ‘Anything but Ordinary’ lit the fire in my stomach. Fire to fight dainty, vomit inducing butterflies and stabbing pains. Repeatedly, I crooned like a cat over the peril of the ordinary, the heart-stopping tedium of normality and the very life I wish I did not call reality. I wanted to be extraordinary.

 

At the tumultuous age of twenty, the curtain fell on my education, mental health and life’s possibility. Hours were no longer dedicated to day dreaming; about opportunities or victories. Instead, minutes were bottled for ironing, the recycling and my lunchbox. Robotic and rigid, security was the prize; yet it would take no leap of faith to get there. Just machinery. I knew I was ordinary, assured it was okay to be ordinary. Still, any throwback hit told me I could be anything but, ordinary.

 

The threat of aging is marked by payslips, deposits and birthdays. Avril is quiet but the fire she lit is smoking. Wisps of wishing and want, curl seductively in the belly of the beast. A beast and beauty, over stimulated – blogging, reading, listening, writing, tweeting, posting, sharing, playing, talking, loving, cooking. My mind is running; fleeing this unsettled human home, where nothing is savoured or kept for too long. Life, my life, is ordinary yet I feel myself swerving from the straight and narrow; onto a wet track of flattened grass. Many things seem certain yet most things are not. On one hand, I teach, on the other, I wish not. You, I, deep down, we all want to be extraordinary. Anything but ordinary.


Kristiana Reed juggles writing and teaching English; in both vocations she endeavours to remind people of their self worth and how dazzlingly beautiful the world can be.

You can read more of Kristiana’s writing at My Screaming Twenties

carpet burn-Lois E. Linkens

carpet burn LL

she craved him like a carpet burn;

the seer of young flesh

on crimson’s rough exhaustion

leaves a glowing scar,

hot in healing

yet reminds her of times

when her legs could brush the rug

in freedom,

now confined

and shackled

to the upright seat of adulthood.


Lois describes herself as a “confused english student,” though one quickly finds a polished, charming poet in her work. She has an elegant style that compliments her keen insight and whimsical sensibilities. You can read more of her work at her self-titled blog.

Girls for Satan- Malicia Frost

Girls for Satan

My best friend used to whisper:
“Let us lay down our lives tonight
here, at the offering table
let us tie our mouths shut
and tape tongues to our legs!
We’ll never be pure again!”

It was funny, back then
when we were a bunch of chuckling preteens
and would sneak into the bathroom together,
pull out or pocket demons
and dance around the sink as if it was a naked calf.

People say girlhood is full of glitter and carnage
we would collect the heads of boys who over-talked us
and we would let the blood water our throats,
nourish our budding lust for revenge.

I kissed my friend’s naked areola
under the blankets in my bed
while we were hiding from our parents
we chewed bubblegum and performed blood offerings monthly
we cried in the shower at night
and sang for the devil watching us in the the moon
we could fall asleep safely
knowing we weren’t alone.

Oh, now what will our parents say?
Girl rejects god, finds self-realization
Girl is full of itches, can no longer accept place in society
Girl found at devil’s side, drinking absinthe and reading obscene books
Girl doesn’t care what you think
Girl touches herself and likes it.
Girl disappoints the world,
pukes all over your condescending words.
Girl gains safety
trough deviation.


Malicia Frost, or Henna, is a hobbyist writer and an aspiring novelist from Finland. She enjoys surrealism, sci-fi and horror, and her works often deal with mental illness. More of her works can be found at her personal blog.]